Samstag, 24. November 2012

握り寿司 Nigirizushi


Three years after my first trip to Tokyo I had the pleasure and honour to visit "my personal master of sushi ceremonies" (= the best sushi chef I know) in his little restaurant again.


Unfortunately I do not know (= can't read) his name nor the name of his restaurant in Ota-ku, Tokyo-City, not far away from Omori station.

With the support of Sapphire I now know the restaurant's name: SUKEROKU.
Thanks for your help, Sapphire!


Here's the building (called twin building) where the sushi restaurant is situated in the fifth floor.

So end of August 2012 I had the pleasure to taste his great pieces of nigirizushi (which is what the world today knows as "sushi") again.


Certainly my Japanese blog fellows are able to read the menu board. For me it was just an enigma, but fortunately my Japanese colleagues ordered for me.

Did you spot the picture postcard from Rothenburg bottom left!? ;-)


I suppose the name of the sushi restaurant is written on the paper cover of the chopsticks. Can anybody translate it for me??? The shrimps obviously are the distinctive feature of the restaurant!?

Isn't this starter a gastronomical piece of poetry??? 
 

As far as I can remember the pieces of nigirizushi coming next are according the right order of courses.
Unfortunately I'm no expert for Japanese food culture at all. 

So please accept my apologies not knowing the correct names of the pieces of sushi.
But maybe I get support from an expert??? ;-)


Looks like salmon? --> sake () ???

--> maguro (): tuna !!!

(Thanks, Yoko!)



What I was able to see is that the order of courses changes between a red piece of fish or shells and whitefish.
No idea what type of fishes I got next...





The alignment of the grains of rice is the same like the structure of the fish or shell.
Coincidence or masterpiece!?




The little green dot is Wasabi, isn't it? ;-)




This little masterpiece the sushi chef made especially for me. It was made from a kind of miniature leek, but I'm not absolutely sure about this.


As a present for my host I had some postcards from Rothenburg painted by the Japanese artist Eichii Takeyama.


 

Thank you very much for this great meal and evening,
dear host and dear Japanese colleagues!


Kommentare:

  1. Japanese presentation is almost amazing to me !

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  2. Hi

    The name of the restaurant is "Sukeroku"!
    I have never been to the place but judging from the sushi in your photos, they look really fresh and good. I suppose it might have cost a lot to eat sushi there. Your photos are really really nice! I wish I could such beautiful photos indoors as yours!!


    PS

    I read your former post too. Various shapes of the rocks are so amazing!



    I read your former post too. The shapes of the rocks are amazing!!

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  3. You made me hungry, UWE! I’m happy for you that you were hosted at such an authentic sushi restaurant with a skillful sheaf. I can see it from the freshness of the ingredients and his techniques and the cleanliness of the shop. I’ve never eaten eggplant sushi or leek one: the restaurant is fit to the pure vegetarians, too. The sixth which you wrote “salmon?” is tuna. Tuna can be a high fat fish, especially expensive Bluefin tuna, but fish oil is your best source of Omega3 fatty acids. You could enjoy yourself at the restaurant because you’re adventurous about eating. I know some people hesitate raw fish and dislike vinegared rice. The master must have been pleased with your special-order gift from Rosenberg.

    Thanks for your comment. Enjoy reunion with your Japanese colleagues and the colorful conference.

    Yoko

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  4. Arigato gozaimasu, Sapphire and Yoko, for your kind comments to my Japanese style dinner and your valuation of my photos and the quality standard of the restaurant.
    I think I couldn't have taken these photos when visiting this restaurant as a normal tourist. But our retired subsidiary manager obviously was a regular guest at Sukeroku and so first the restaurant owner accepted, later he liked my photographic interpretation of his work.
    Uwe.

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  5. Hallo Uwe!!!
    Yummy, yummy! I love Japanese food!!! Your pictures were so perfect, I could sense the fresh fish right in front of me. As for the perfect alignment of the rice and fish, what a masterpiece!
    Rothenburg, what a great combo: a German city + Japanese food!
    Cheers to that!
    Márcia

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  6. Thanks a lot for stoping by, Márcia, although it's a long distance between Brasil and Germany... :-)
    Enjoying sushi in its country of origin - yes, of course. I'd love to. But here in Germany...??? But it's the same with many other foodstuffs, they are best where they have a long tradition and where they are firmly established as food culture. Or do you enjoy Schweinshaxe mit Sauerkraut regularly in Brasil with great relish???
    Enjoy your meals, Uwe.
    :-)

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  7. Sushi with some mitiature leek looks interesting. After some fish, red,white and nutral, it must been satisfying.
    Thank you very much for visiting my blog and have left your kind comment.

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  8. Thanks for your nice comment, Haricot.
    Have a great weekend, Uwe.

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  9. Beautiful pictures, the food looks delicious.
    Thanks for your comment on my blog.
    Have a wonderful Sunday, Irma

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  10. Márcia Cobar hat einen neuen Kommentar zu Ihrem Post "握り寿司 Nigirizushi" hinterlassen:

    Sorry, Márcia, I deleted your comment by accident, so I was not able to publish it as usual. But I was able to copy and paste your comment manually...

    Márcia wrote:
    "Ha ha... No way I will have a Schweinshaxe in Brasilian!
    Id better have it in Germany. Days ago I saw some Nurnberger Würstchen on a special market here... I bought them and erg :(
    No way they resembled the real Wurste.
    Bottom line: id better go back to Germany.
    Pröst."

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  11. You-wee,
    Oh, I missed this lovely blog about Sushi! What I love the best in Japanese Cuisine is that they please the eye as well as the palate. You said it exactly “Isn't this starter a gastronomical piece of poetry???” Moreover did you enjoy his performance? I mean his technique for preparing Sushi. He holds rice in his right hand and puts Wasabi on a piece of raw fish. In a second, Sushi is ready! I always love this kind of performance in Sushi restaurant. Your photos are so excellent that my mouth waters.
    keiko

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